2013 Winners of the Tufts Research Visualization Awards Announced

Dawn Irish
Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 11:00am

TTS has been actively promoting scientific visualization as a research tool at Tufts since it collaborated with the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering to create the NSF-funded Tufts Center for Scientific Visualization in 2008. To further this effort, TTS launched in 2010 the first Visualizing Research@Tufts Awards program with the goal of promoting visualization as a research tool for all disciplines, showcasing Tufts research projects, and providing opportunities for research collaboration. The program is based on the NSF’s International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge.

Each spring Tufts faculty and students actively participating in Tufts research projects are invited to submit materials in three different categories: photography, illustrations and software. The entries are evaluated by a panel of seven judges who are selected from across the university.

Please join us for the awards ceremony where all the entries will be showcased:

When: 3-5 pm, Wednesday, April 17

Where: Alumnae Lounge, Medford Campus

The awards ceremony will run from 3:15 to 4 pm. Following the awards ceremony, the entries will be on display.

The winners in each category are as follows:

Photography and Illustrations

First Place
Microstructural Heterogeneity of a Healing Wound
Kyle P. Quinn, Postdoctoral Scholar, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering
Benjamin D. Almquist, Postdoctoral Fellow, Chemical Engineering, MIT
Paula T. Hammond, Professor, Chemical Engineering, MIT
Irene Georgakoudi, Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering

Second Place
Sphere Packing on Ellipsoidal Surfaces
Christopher Burke, Graduate Student, Physics, School of Arts and Sciences
Badel Mbanga, Postdoctoral Associate, Physics, School of Arts and Sciences
Timothy Atherton, Assistant Professor, Physics, School of Arts and Sciences

Third Place
Visualization Of The Limbal Vasculature Using Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography Following Speckle Variance Processing
Mehreen Adhi, Postdoctoral Scholar, Opthalmology, School of Medicine
Kevin Sitko, Clinical Associate, Opthalmology, School of Medicine
Jay S Duker, Professor and Chair, Opthalmology, School of Medicine
Chandrasekharan Krishnan, Assistant Professor, Opthalmology, School of Medicine

Video

First Place
Blood vessel and Collagen Organization in the Heart
Kyle P. Quinn, Postdoctoral Scholar, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering
Kelly Sullivan, PhD Student, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering
Zachary S. Ballard , Undergraduate Student, Physics, Brown University
Lauren D. Black, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering
Irene Georgakoudi, Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering

Second Place
Optical Microwell Arrays for Single Molecule Sensing
Huaibin Zhang, Postdoctoral Scholar, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
Stephanie M. Schubert, Student, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
Shuai Nie, Student, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
Kathryn Mayer, Postdoctoral Scholar, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
David R. Walt, Professor, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences

Third Place
Revamping the Kimberley Process
Dani Jenkins, Undergraduate, School of Arts and Sciences
Stephanie Krantz, Undergraduate, School of Arts and Sciences
Karen Bustard, Undergraduate, School of Arts and Sciences
Daniel Goodman, Undergraduate, School of Arts and Sciences
Meagan Maher, Undergraduate, School of Arts and Sciences

Software 

First Place
Automated Visualization and Quantification of Fiber Orientation
Kyle Quinn, Postdoctoral Scholar, Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering

Second Place
Planform: A Software Tool for Visualizing, Curating, and Mining Regenerative Experiments
Daniel Lobo, Postdoctoral Associate, Biology, School of Arts and Sciences
Taylor J. Malone, Undergraduate Student, Biology, School of Arts and Sciences
Michael Levin, Vannevar Bush Professor, Biology, School of Arts and Sciences

Visualization is an important research tool that has been used to help understand data, processes, structures, and concepts in fields ranging from engineering to humanities and from health sciences to social sciences. The most widespread forms of visualization are graphs, pie charts, workflows, photographs and animations. When well-designed, visualizations are powerful tools for communication as they create a visceral, emotional connection to the results. By putting data into a spatial context, the researcher is able to convey more information and to support recall, inference, and decision-making.

This contest is open to people in all disciplines at Tufts who are creating visualizations as  part of scholarly activities taking place at Tufts.  This includes:

  • Tufts faculty working on Tufts based work
  • Students working with Tufts faculty on Tufts based work
  • Staff if conducting scholarly activities as part of their Tufts responsibilities

If you have questions about the program please send an email to vis-awards@tufts.edu.